King’s College Chapel, University of Aberdeen

King's Chapel from the Elphinstone Cloisters, University of Aberdeen
King’s Chapel

Whilst out on a lovely walk around Old Aberdeen on a beautiful sunny evening, I captured this image of King’s College Chapel from the cloisters of Elphinstone Hall at the university.

I love the summer sun – long may it last!

Advertisements

Aberdeen Boat Club

Rowing has rather a chequered history in Aberdeen. Tracing its roots back to the 1860s, the activity grew in popularity, but suffered as a result of poor membership in the 1950s. In 1969, following an attempt to rekindle interest, the popularity once again dropped.

By the mid 1970s, rowing had begun its resurgence in part as a result of some successes internationally, and in the early 1980s the first part of the boathouse was built.

Taking a walk along the River Dee yesterday, I noticed that the building looked rather inviting in the sunlight.

Aberdeen Boat Club
Aberdeen Boat Club

Situated a few hundred meters along the river bank are the remaining rowing organisations of Aberdeen Asset Schools Boathouse, AURC & RGU Student Association Rowing Club.

Aberdeen Asset Schools Boathouse, AURC & RGU Student Association
Aberdeen Asset Schools, AURC & RGU Student Association Rowing Club

The city now has a thriving rowing community, comprising of members of all abilities, and the Aberdeen Boat Club is now the largest such organisation in Scotland.

If you’re interested in joining, click here.

Sir Duncan Rice Library, Aberdeen

IMG_3552-Edit-Edit-Edit
Bold and Beautiful

The library is situated on the western edge of the University of Aberdeen’s King’s College campus. It was completed in 2012, and built to replace the Queen Mother Library which sat directly south of it on the same site (to the right hand side in the image).

The original library had been built in 1965 and then subsequently extended in 1978 and then again in 1982. However, it was never designed for the large number of visitors that it served, and so a replacement was sought. The architects Schmidt Hammer Lassen won the project to commission the new space.

The Sir Duncan Rice building is a simple cube from the outside, clad in an irregular pattern of insulated glazing. The glazed surface appears to float above ground level. The dark panels are transparent, the lighter ones are not.

On the north side, glass elevators rise to each of the floors. From within each there is an unobstructed view of St. Machar Drive and the University’s Zoology building.

From the centre of the ground floor looking upwards, irregular curved cut-outs on each of the floors create an atrium that extends towards the sky for a breathtaking view.

My image does not allude to the sheer boldness of the architects who have designed a piece which sits within the grounds of an ancient university. The library is a mere stones-throw away from King’s College which was built around the year 1500.

In fact the two buildings are visible to each other. Just a few hundred yards and 400 years apart.