Bridge of Dee, Aberdeen

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Ribbed Arches

The Bridge of Dee is situated towards the south end of the city at the terminus of South Anderson Drive, and despite other additions to the city’s infrastructure, is still a major thoroughfare. It is however a major bottleneck for vehicles especially at peak times, as it only supports one lane of traffic in each direction.

The bridge, unsurprisingly, spans the river Dee, and comprises seven ribbed arches. Constructed of dressed stone, a number of coats of arms are still visible today.

The Bridge of Dee was originally constructed in 1520 with £20,000 of funds bequeathed by prominent Renaissance Bishop, William Elphinstone (1431-1514) who founded Kings College, and drove the restoration of St. Machar’s Cathedral, both of which are situated in Old Aberdeen.

During its lifetime, the bridge has been restored in 1721 and widened in 1841. The widening was coordinated by City Architect, John Smith (1781-1852), who had originally proposed to build a new bridge, however the city council of the time declined.

Until 1832, the bridge was the only access to the city from the south. Plans are afoot to create a new Dee crossing so as to remove the bottleneck at this ancient structure, however, nothing has so far been crystallised.

When the water level in the river permits, it is possible to walk under the first arch through to the other side, as part of a much longer riverside walk along the Dee.

The image shows three of the ribbed arches from the south-side of the structure.

Fog in the ‘Deen

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Fogger-deen

I took this mono image of the city from the Torry Battery whilst scouting a location for an upcoming photo shoot.

As I took-in the view, I noticed that the image captures a number of features of the city.

There are elements of the old: the intricate towers in the centre of the frame are Marischal College and the Citadel. To the left of these are the three cranes used in the construction of the new Marischal Square development – a project that has split the opinions of the city’s residents.

In the left of the foreground is Footdee (“Fittie”), a small fishing village based at the mouth of the river Dee. The large, imposing tower in Fittie is the Marine Operations Centre. Fishing and the sea are of great importance to the city.

The view is built-up in layers as a result of the light fog, which makes for a sense of depth.

 

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Premier Oil New Build

This was my first ever visit to the Prime Four business park, and I reckon that it’s quickly taking shape!

The estate is promoted as a socially and creatively stimulating work and leisure environment, which blends the contemporary built spaces into the natural landscape. Whilst the entire park isn’t fully completed yet, the area in the picture around the Premier Oil building certainly appears to encourage interaction.

I look forward to returning to shoot the site again once the water feature is fully working, as I think that it will bring the area to life as it extends and winds it way past the facade of the building.

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Water Feature Outside the Cafe

This water feature is easily missed as you pass-by the fountain on your way to the Hazlehead cafe. I took this long exposure in order to capture the wetness of the carved rock slab. I was particularly taken with the autumnal colours and green moss, as well as the tiny, wispy water falls.

To this day, I still don’t know if this sculpture has a name! If anyone knows, please comment below, as I’d love to know.